DEVILISHLY DELICIOUS: Deviled Eggs, Three Ways

Three Deviled Eggs, All in a Row Deviled eggs are as familiar to most Americans as apple pie. Certainly, they have been a staple at picnics and family dinners for decades. During the week following Easter, the inevitable surplus of hard-boiled eggs makes deviled eggs practically a requirement in many households.

But how did deviled eggs come about and where did they get their curious name?

Eggs, of course, have been a source of food for thousands upon thousands of years. The mingling of spices with eggs clearly goes back as far as ancient Rome. Apicus (from whom we derive our modern word “epicurean”) reports in his famous cookbook that “boiled eggs can be seasoned with pepper”.

A recipe for stuffed eggs including mustard from around the 15th century is probably the first documented occurrence of something close enough to be recognizable as “deviled eggs”. Almost certainly, some form of deviled eggs predated the 1700s.

There is ample evidence that “deviling” foods had already become quite popular in Britain by the 18th-century. In a biography published in 1791, James Boswell, Samuel Johnson’s biographer, referred to partaking of a dish of “devilled bones” for supper.

Bones or carcasses of cold cooked poultry, game or beef were brushed or covered with one of several kinds of highly spiced “devil sauces”, which were then grilled until brown on top. The similarity to our modern “barbecue” is unmistakable!

Without a doubt, the word “devil” was already well-established as a cooking term meaning “to cook something with hot spices or condiments, especially cayenne or mustard.” Most believe that the term was adopted because of the connection between the devil and the excessive heat in Hell. This does not mean to suggest that “deviled” food is in any way Satanic.

By the 19th century, the use of “deviled” was well-known In America. In 1820, the author Washington Irving used the word to describe a highly seasoned dish which sounds quite similar to a curry.

One particularly familiar devilish dish, “deviled ham” as we now know it, first came about when the Underwood Company started experimenting with spiced ham recipes around 1868. Soon, they received a patent on their now-famous little red devil logo and began producing deviled ham in the familiar small cans. It quickly caught on and home cooks were soon making their own versions of the stuff.

Today the word “deviled” is commonly applied to any number of spicy dishes. The rest is history!

 

Deviled Eggs, Three Ways

Wasabi Deviled Eggs

Wasabi Deviled Eggs with Tobikko

Wasabi Deviled Eggs with Tobikko

Even someone who adores deviled eggs can get tired of making them the same way over and over and over. Wasabi makes this recipe nicely spicy. The wasabi turns the egg yolks a delicate shade of pale greenish-gold and the flying fish roe adds a little pop to each bite.

Ingredients:
Directions:

Shell the eggs, cut in half lengthways and remove the yolks. Set the whites aside on a large plate.

Using a food processor, process the yolks with the mayonnaise and Wasabi powder until smooth. In a small bowl, gently mix the yolk mixture with the tobikko and pickled ginger.  Add a little more mayonnaise if the mixture seems too dry.

Using a pastry bag or a spoon, fill the hollow of the egg white with the yolk mixture. Sprinkle the sliced scallions, black sesame seeds and shichimi chile pepper over the top. Garnish with a little more tobikko, if desired.

 

Pesto Deviled Eggs

Pesto Deviled Eggs

Pesto Deviled Eggs

In this updated version of the classic recipe, the addition of savory pesto makes deviled eggs especially tasty.

Homemade Basil Pesto

Homemade Basil Pesto

Ingredients:
  • 6 hard boiled eggs
  • 3 Tbsp mayonnaise
  • 3 Tbsp basil pesto, plus extra for garnish
  • salt & pepper, to taste
Directions:

Shell the eggs, cut in half lengthways and remove the yolks. Set the whites aside on a large plate.

Mash the yolks with a fork in a bowl. Stir in the pesto and mayonnaise. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Using a pastry bag or a spoon, fill the hollow of the egg white with the yolk/pesto mixture. Garnish each filled egg half with a small dollop of pesto.

 

 

Truffled Deviled Eggs

Deviled Eggs with Truffles

Deviled Eggs with Truffles

Truffled Deviled Eggs – so good, they’re heavenly. Truffles and eggs just naturally go well together, so why not add a touch of unexpectedly rich flavor and elegance to an old favorite?

Ingredients:
  • 6 fresh eggs
  • 2 Tbsp mayonnaise
  • 2 Tbsp truffle butter, softened
  • 1 1/2 tsp finely minced green onions, white part only
  • salt and fresh ground pepper, to taste
  • Truffle oil, to taste (optional)
  • Truffle salt, for garnish
Directions:

Shell the eggs, cut in half lengthways and remove the yolks. Set the whites aside on a large plate.

Place the yolks in a small mixing bowl. Using a fork, mix thoroughly to break up the yolks. Combine the yolks with the mayonnaise, softened truffle butter and minced onion and mix until smooth. Season with truffle oil, salt and pepper to taste.

Using a pastry bag or a spoon, fill the hollow of the egg white with the yolk mixture. Garnish each filled egg half with a sprinkle of truffle salt, if desired.

 

Peeled Hardboiled Eggs

 

Curly Divider

 

Many of the ingredients used in this recipe, and other recipes on the Earthy Delights Blog, can be purchased online at our retail website, Earthy.com. We welcome you to visit the Earthy.com website to view our extensive selection of hard-to-find ingredients and our complete Recipe Collection of over 500 tested recipes.

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